FAQs

All FAQs are listed here. Or you can choose from a category listed above.
If you’d like to see an FAQ not listed, you can suggest it.

Resident Training Licensees

  1. Is it okay to complete my license renewal online using a mobile device?
  2. Is it okay to fill out a license application online using a mobile device?
  3. Do I need to renew my RTL if I am applying for a full NC medical license?
  4. I am an RTL applying for a full license. Should I make my home address my NCMB mailing address?
  5. As a current RTL applying for a full license do I need to submit new fingerprint cards?
  6. How do I update my address info after my residency ends?
  7. RTLs do not have a license number. What should I do when asked to provide one?

About the Board

  1. What is the correct mailing address for the Board?
  2. Are Board meetings and hearings open to the public?
  3. How often does the North Carolina Medical Board meet?
  4. How long may a Board member serve?
  5. How are Board members chosen?
  6. What is the North Carolina Medical Board and what does it do?
  7. What medical professionals does the Board license and regulate?
  8. Does the Medical Board receive funding from state or local governments?
  9. Is the North Carolina Medical Board part of state government?

Change in Staff Privileges (CISP)

  1. What are the possible repercussions for physicians on whom reports are made?
  2. Must hospitals report suspensions for failure to submit a timely request for reappointment?
  3. What does the Board mean by “summary suspension”?
  4. How soon must hospitals report privileging actions to the Board?
  5. Must a hospital report privilege revocations in response to a disciplinary action by the Board?
  6. Must a hospital notify the Board any time a physician seeks an addition or decrease in privileges?
  7. Must a hospital report a privilege suspension imposed for failure to complete medical records?
  8. Is it necessary to notify the Board when a practitioner’s status changes from active to courtesy?

Complaints

  1. What types of punishment do publicly disciplined providers receive?
  2. How often does a complaint result in the Board taking formal disciplinary action against a provider?
  3. What are the possible outcomes of a complaint?
  4. Once I file my complaint, what happens?
  5. Will my provider dismiss me as a patient if I file a complaint?
  6. Will filing a complaint resolve the problem I have with my provider?
  7. What are some examples of issues the Medical Board cannot address through the complaint process?
  8. What kinds of issues can the Medical Board address through the complaint process?

Consumer Info

  1. What is the correct mailing address for the Board?
  2. What is a doctor of osteopathic medicine (DO)?
  3. What types of punishment do publicly disciplined providers receive?
  4. How often does a complaint result in the Board taking formal disciplinary action against a provider?
  5. What are the possible outcomes of a complaint?
  6. Once I file my complaint, what happens?
  7. Will my provider dismiss me as a patient if I file a complaint?
  8. Will filing a complaint resolve the problem I have with my provider?
  9. What are some examples of issues the Medical Board cannot address through the complaint process?
  10. What kinds of issues can the Medical Board address through the complaint process?
  11. What medical professionals does the Board license and regulate?
  12. If a licensee has a public file, does that mean he or she has been disciplined by the Board?

Continuing Medical Education (CME)

  1. This is my very first renewal. How do I enter my CME?
  2. What is the CME requirement under the revised CME rules that went into effect August 1, 2012?
  3. How many CME hours do I get for passing an initial special board certification examination?
  4. What if I continue to earn Category 2 CME hours?
  5. Are any physician licensees exempt from CME requirements in NC?
  6. Where can I view my current CME hours?
  7. How long must I keep my CME documentation?
  8. What do I do if my CME cycle is not showing up correctly when I check it during my annual renewal?
  9. When does my CME cycle start?
  10. I am a resident or fellow. How do I record my CME?
  11. What if I have additional questions about CME that are not answered on the Board’s website?
  12. If I am retired and/or have a volunteer license, do I still need to comply with the CME rule?
  13. Is there a minimum total of CME hours that must be earned in a given year?
  14. May I use the Physician’s Recognition Award for reporting CME?
  15. May I roll excess CME hours over to the next three-year cycle?
  16. Must I submit documentation to the Board?

Disciplinary Process

  1. How can I access public documents related to pending or closed NCMB disciplinary cases?
  2. When does a disciplinary case against a particular licensee of the Board become public?
  3. Who prosecutes disciplinary cases on behalf of the Board?

License Application

  1. USMLE and COMLEX: Is there a limit on the number of attempts to pass?
  2. Can I use electronic fingerprinting to complete the fingerprinting requirement?
  3. Is it okay to fill out a license application online using a mobile device?
  4. I completed the FCVS application. Do I also need to complete the NCMB application?
  5. Why can’t I log back into my application to make changes or update information?
  6. How do I know if my medical school qualifies for licensure?
  7. Does NC offer a teleradiology license?
  8. Will I need a personal interview?
  9. How long will it take to get my license?
  10. What do I do with the State of Connecticut form?
  11. You have two mailing addresses, which one should I use?
  12. Can I fax documents to the Board to include in my application?
  13. What is the best way for me to check the status of my application?
  14. What if an item on my check status is marked not received but the items does not apply to me?
  15. If I’m applying for a full license, do I still need to register my training license?
  16. How do I find out if I’m registered with FCVS (Federation Credentials Verification Service)?
  17. Do I need to obtain a license verification if I have only held training licenses?
  18. Does the NC Medical Board issue a locum tenens license?
  19. Does the NC Medical Board issue temporary licenses?
  20. How do I convert my resident training license to a full license?
  21. Where do I send the fingerprint cards?
  22. How do I get the fingerprint cards required for my background check and where do I get them filled out?
  23. Does North Carolina recognize medical licenses issued by any other states?

License Renewal

  1. This is my very first renewal. How do I enter my CME?
  2. Is it okay to complete my license renewal online using a mobile device?
  3. How do I get a copy of my receipt and certificate after renewing?
  4. Is there a grace period to renew my RTL?
  5. Where can I view my current CME hours?
  6. If I’m applying for a full license, do I still need to register my training license?
  7. How do I make my license inactive and what does that mean in NC?
  8. Why won’t the online renewal form accept my CME entries?
  9. I am trying to indicate hospital privileges, but my NC hospital is not among the available choices.
  10. I live out of state and cannot enter my hospital privileges
  11. I live out of state. Why can’t I enter my county?
  12. How long does it take to process a license renewal?
  13. I am a licensee and I am going out of the country for a year. May I renew my license early?
  14. I failed to renew my license on time. Is my license made inactive immediately?
  15. I just received my medical license and my birthday is next week. Do I have to renew my license?

Licensee Information Page

  1. Where can I view my current CME hours?
  2. I am having trouble opening a Public file. I only see the first page.
  3. Is there a limit in the number of publications I enter on the Publications page?
  4. I do not have a practice address. Does this mean my home address will be published?
  5. I recently renewed my license, so you should have all the required information. Do I need to enter the data again for the Licensee Information pages?
  6. I would prefer that my email address not be public.  Do I need to remove this from my Address page?
  7. Where can I find my File ID number?
  8. Can I provide my information over the telephone or submit it in writing?
  9. Who can I contact if I need assistance?
  10. What happens if I don’t update my Licensee Information page?
  11. Do I need to report malpractice cases that happened prior to May 1, 2008?
  12. I do not have any public actions, felonies, malpractice, misdemeanor convictions or privileges suspended but I do not see a space where I can enter "not applicable". What should I enter?
  13. After I fill out a page and click "Apply", nothing happens. The system will not allow me to move to the next page. Why?
  14. I was interrupted while entering my information and when I returned to my computer, I was not able to apply/save the information I had been entering. What went wrong and what should I do?
  15. How do I change some of the information I entered for my Licensee Information Page?
  16. How do I log into my Licensee Information Page?

Perfusionist

  1. Why does the licensing process take so long?
  2. Do I need a supervising perfusionist?
  3. I have a provisional perfusionist license. How do I get a full unrestricted license?
  4. How do I get my Education Certification form completed if my school/program has closed?

Physician Assistant

  1. Do PAs need to meet face-to-face with their primary supervising physician for quality improvement meetings?
  2. I lost my primary supervising physician on short notice. What should I do?
  3. Are PAs required to recertify in order to keep their NC PA licenses active?
  4. What kind of work can a PA who has graduated but is not yet licensed do?
  5. I need a copy of my Intent to Practice acknowledgement letter. Can the Board provide me with one?
  6. Can a PA prescribe controlled substances within U.S. DEA rule and not violate the Board's PA prescribing rules?
  7. Do NC rules for PAs apply to those employed by the federal government and working in a federal facility?
  8. I haven’t received any information, where was it sent?
  9. I completed my Intent to Practice form, when can I begin practicing?
  10. What’s the best way to complete the Intent to Practice form?
  11. Can I submit my application if information is missing?
  12. How many PAs are licensed in North Carolina?
  13. Can third parties contact NCMB for information on the status of a pending PA license application?
  14. May a physician assistant supervise a physician in a resident training program?
  15. Does the supervising physician have to cosign inpatient chart entries made by a PA?
  16. How often must a supervising physician meet with the PA?
  17. Is the supervising physician responsible for the PA’s medical acts?
  18. Is on-site, physical presence of supervising physician required at all times the PA is practicing?
  19. How many supervising physicians are required to be designated for each PA?
  20. What written form of “Supervisory Arrangement” is required between a PA and supervising physician?
  21. What is meant by “scope of practice”?
  22. If I fail to renew my license, how much time do I have before my license is made inactive?
  23. Does a PA need to renew his or her license every year?
  24. How many PAs can a physician supervise?
  25. My PA license was made inactive for failure to register. How do I reactivate/reinstate it?
  26. My birthday is now here. Do I need to pay the registration fee so soon after receiving my PA license?
  27. What does my PA badge need to read?
  28. Do I need to provide documentation of CME with my application and if so, how much?
  29. Does the NCMB specify what medical tasks a PA may perform?
  30. Do I need to put my PA license on inactive status if I no longer have a primary supervising MD?
  31. Do I need to send NCMB a list of backup supervising physicians?
  32. Must I receive written acknowledgement of my Intent to Practice from NCMB before I may practice?
  33. How do I submit the Intent to Practice Form?
  34. How many total reference letters are required for a PA application?
  35. What could hold up my PA application and delay the issue of my license?
  36. How long does it take for a PA application to be processed and a license to be issued?
  37. What is the PA application process?
  38. Do I need a primary supervising physician prior to applying for a PA license?
  39. Does the NC Medical Board issue initial temporary licenses for PAs?

Polysomnography Registration

  1. Does a Sleep Tech/Polysomnographic Technologist have a license number?
  2. Why is the NC Medical Board establishing a registry of polysomnographic technologists (commonly referred to as sleep techs)?
  3. What if a sleep tech fails to register?
  4. Will the Medical Board process complaints and investigate possible violations of the Polysomnography Practice Act and/or disciplinary matters?
  5. Are there any exemptions to the registration requirement?
  6. When will the Medical Board be ready to accept registration information?
  7. Will the Medical Board accept paper registration forms?
  8. Will sleep techs pay a registration fee?
  9. How often must sleep techs register with the Medical Board?
  10. What information must be submitted to the Medical Board?
  11. What constitutes "evidence" that the sleep tech is credentialed in good standing by the Board of Registered Polysomnographic Technologists?
  12. Has the Medical Board issued supervision protocols for registered polysomnographic technologists?

Professional Corporations and Limited Liability Companies

  1. Is it okay to renew my Professional Corporation registration online using a mobile device?
  2. What is a professional corporation, association or limited liability company?
  3. Who can form a professional corporation, association or limited liability company?
  4. Can a physician or physician assistant incorporate or organize with others?
  5. If I plan to offer more than one type of professional service, should I obtain a certificate of registration for each allowable combination of professional services?
  6. Can a physician assistant own a professional corporation or limited liability company?
  7. Can a PA form a professional corporation or limited liability company with a physician, yet the PA owns a majority of the stock or membership?
  8. Can a PA own 100 percent of a professional corporation or limited liability company and hire physicians as employees or independent contractors to practice medicine?
  9. Do I need to notify the NC Medical Board if I sell my practice or merge with another business?
  10. Are there any limitations on ownership/membership of capital stock in a professional corporation, association or limited liability company?
  11. Where can I find information on how to register a professional corporation, association or limited liability company and the requirements to maintain the registration?

Reactivating or Reinstating a License

  1. Who is eligible to submit an application to reactivate a physician license?
  2. What is the difference between a license reactivation and a license reinstatement?
  3. If a physician does not meet the criteria to reactivate a license, what other options exist?
  4. What is the process for reinstating a physician license?
  5. What is the process for reactivating a physician license?

Verifications

  1. What do I need to do if I am applying for international adoption?
  2. Should I call to ensure you received my online request?
  3. I took the exam in North Carolina. Can you send my scores?
  4. What if the other state (or agency) will not accept an online verification?
  5. What if I need a “letter of good standing”, not a verification letter?
  6. What if I have a form that needs to be completed?

Resident Training Licensees

  • Is it okay to complete my license renewal online using a mobile device?

    No, it is not recommended. Mobile devices are not supported at this time.

  • Is it okay to fill out a license application online using a mobile device?

    No, it is not recommended. Mobile devices are not supported at this time.

  • Do I need to renew my RTL if I am applying for a full NC medical license?

    Yes, unless the full license application is approved and a full license is issued BEFORE your RTL renewal date.

  • I am an RTL applying for a full license. Should I make my home address my NCMB mailing address?

    Yes, it is recommended.

  • As a current RTL applying for a full license do I need to submit new fingerprint cards?

    If the original fingerprint cards you submitted to the NCMB were sent in more than one year ago, you must submit new ones.  If you are filling out the full physician license application using FCVS, please reference the application checklist for items that FCVS will provide to NCMB.

  • How do I update my address info after my residency ends?

    Email .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or send a fax to 919-326-1131. Please provide your full name.

  • RTLs do not have a license number. What should I do when asked to provide one?

    The NCMB does not assign a license number to residents. When filling out forms that request a license number, leave the space blank, or use “RTL” to indicate that you hold a resident training license.

back to Resident Training Licensees

About the Board

  • What is the correct mailing address for the Board?

    You may use either the Board’s street address or P.O. Box address to send mail to the Board. However, if you are sending a package or envelope via FedEx, you MUST send it to the street address.

    The Board’s street address is:

    1203 Front Street
    Raleigh, NC, 27609-7533

    The Board’s P.O. Box address is:

    P.O. Box 20007
    Raleigh, NC, 27619-0007

  • Are Board meetings and hearings open to the public?

    Yes, though certain portions of meetings or hearings may be closed. For example certain committees of the Board, such as those that discuss investigative matters or pending complaints, are closed to the public. However, many agenda items of interest to the public, such as disciplinary hearings or presentations of settled disciplinary cases, are conducted in open session.

  • How often does the North Carolina Medical Board meet?

    The full Board meets every other month in the odd-numbered months ( i.e., January, March, May). The Board holds hearings in disciplinary cases in even-numbered months (i.e. February, April, June). The Board’s meeting schedule is published on this Web site and meeting agendas and hearing dockets are posted on the site in accordance with open meeting laws, typically 48 hours before a meeting or hearing. Meetings are typically scheduled over three full days (usually Wednesday, Thursday and Friday).

  • How long may a Board member serve?

    Board members may serve up to two consecutive three-year terms.

  • How are Board members chosen?

    The Governor of North Carolina appoints all members of the Board. The Governor has the authority to directly appoint the Board’s three public members (North Carolina citizens with no ties to medicine or the health care industry) and one member who, by statute, must be either a physician who practices integrative medicine or is on the faculty of one of the state’s academic medical centers. Seven physcians Board members and one member who is either a physician assistant or nurse practitioner are nominated by an independent panel and then appointed by the Governor. The panel includes representatives from physician, nursing and physician assistant groups and also includes one sitting public member of the Board.

  • What is the North Carolina Medical Board and what does it do?

    The North Carolina Medical Board is made up of 12 individuals, including eight physicians, who are charged with licensing and regulating doctors, physician assistants and certain other medical professionals. The Board’s primary mission is to protect the public. It screens candidates for licensure, issues licenses to qualified professionals, develops rules and positons that guide its licensees and, when necessary, disciplines its licensees.

  • What medical professionals does the Board license and regulate?

    The Board issues licenses to medical doctors (MDs), doctors of osteopathic medicine (DOs), physician assistants (PAs), certified clinical perfusionists and anesthesiologist assistants, and regulates their practice. It approves the practice of nurse practitioners and clinical pharmacist practitioners and jointly regulates those professions with the NC Board of Nursing and NC Board of Pharmacy, respectively.

  • Does the Medical Board receive funding from state or local governments?

    No. One hundred percent of the Board’s operating revenue comes from fees paid by its licensees, including license application and annual renewal fees.

  • Is the North Carolina Medical Board part of state government?

    No. The medical board is an independent agency that regulates the practice of medicine and surgery on behalf of the state of North Carolina. Medical Board employees are not on the state payroll and do not qualify for state benefits or retirement.

back to About the Board

Change in Staff Privileges (CISP)

  • What are the possible repercussions for physicians on whom reports are made?

    The reports themselves have no direct repercussions. The General Assembly’s requiring of such reports implies that the Board should review them and take whatever action is appropriate under law. The reports and the underlying hospital actions are not reasons under the law for the Board to act against a physician’s license. However, the reports may prompt further inquiry and investigation to determine if grounds exist. Many privilege change reports will not lead to Board actions. Some CISP reports, however, will lead the Board to discover evidence of grounds for the initiation of a case, which may lead to disciplinary action by the Board.

  • Must hospitals report suspensions for failure to submit a timely request for reappointment?

    Yes.

  • What does the Board mean by “summary suspension”?

    The general reference is to the practice of some entities of suspending a physician’s privileges before a “due process hearing” has been conducted. The Board understands some entities use this procedure in emergencies. The Board has also become aware that some of these emergency situations were not reported to the Board until the full due process called for in the entity’s bylaws had been completed, sometimes months after the emergency had arisen.

  • How soon must hospitals report privileging actions to the Board?

    State law specifies that privilege changes be reported within 30 days of the effective date of the action. However, some healthcare facilties report certain actions, such as summary suspensions, immediately.

  • Must a hospital report privilege revocations in response to a disciplinary action by the Board?

    Yes. The law requires the reporting of “any” privilege change made for cause, except in suspensions or other actions related to delinquent medical records. In such cases, the hospital need only report the privilege change if three offenses occur in the same calendar year.

  • Must a hospital notify the Board any time a physician seeks an addition or decrease in privileges?

    No, only changes that are the result of an adverse action must be reported.

  • Must a hospital report a privilege suspension imposed for failure to complete medical records?

    Only if the suspension is the third for that cause within the calendar year, in which case all three suspensions must be reported.

  • Is it necessary to notify the Board when a practitioner’s status changes from active to courtesy?

    Yes, if the change is due to an adverse action or in response to a pending or threatened adverse action.

back to Change in Staff Privileges (CISP)

Complaints

  • What types of punishment do publicly disciplined providers receive?

    The Board is authorized to mete out a wide range of public disciplinary actions that limit, suspend or even revoke the right to practice. A medical license is revoked only in the most serious cases where the provider’s conduct or level of competence is considered to pose a significant threat to public health and safety. Far more often, the Board acts to restrict the license by imposing conditions aimed at preventing future problems. For example, a physician disciplined for prescribing narcotic painkillers without adequately documenting the need or taking steps to prevent addiction might be barred from prescribing such drugs for a set period and required to complete continuing medical education on managing chronic pain. In some cases, the Board determines no action against the provider’s license is warranted but issues a public letter of concern. All final disciplinary actions are noted on the Board’s Web site.

  • How often does a complaint result in the Board taking formal disciplinary action against a provider?

    Only about one percent of the 1,200 complaints received annually result in public action being taken against the provider’s license. Often when no action is taken, it is because no violation of the Medical Practice Act has occurred and the matter is therefore not actionable. In another 30 percent of cases, the complaint leads to private discipline, such as a confidential letter expressing the Board’s concern and cautioning against similar conduct in future.  When no formal action is taken, the Board keeps a copy of the complaint in its permanent file.  This file is an important resource that helps the Board track providers over time and detect patterns of behavior that might warrant future intervention.

  • What are the possible outcomes of a complaint?

    Complaints are most often resolved in one of three ways.

    • No formal action. Typically, this is the result when no violation of the Medical Practice Act has occurred. However, the provider is notified and the information is kept on file. This allows the Board to spot recurrent issues or a pattern of behavior that may cause the Board to intervene in future.
    • Private action is taken. There may be no violation of the Medical Practice Act that warrants public action, but the Board is nonetheless concerned about some aspect of the provider’s conduct or performance. In such cases, the Board takes private action, such as a confidential letter of concern to the provider that cautions against repeating similar conduct.  Alternatively, licensees may be brought before the Board for a private interview. The contents of the letter or interview are confidential.
    • Public action is taken. In these cases, the Board determines there was a violation of the Medical Practice Act and takes formal public action. For example, this may be in the form of a public letter of concern, an order imposing conditions or restrictions on the license, a suspension of the licensee’s authority to practice or some other type of action.
  • Once I file my complaint, what happens?

    Here is a brief description of the complaint review process:

    • Complaints are generally acknowledged within 2 weeks via USPS.
    •  
    • All complaints are initially reviewed to determine if there is a possible violation of the Medical Practice Act that rises to the level of further inquiry.
    • If the conduct that prompted the complaint is not found to be a violation of the Medical Practice Act, you are informed of this in your initial letter and the case is closed.  However, the licensee is informed of your complaint and the information is kept on file.
    • If a possible violation has occurred and further inquiry is warranted through the Complaint Department a copy of your complaint is sent to the licensee for review and response to the Board; medical records are obtained as necessary.
    • Typically your written complaint serves as your full statement and you will not be contacted by the Board unless clarification or additional information is needed.
    • Case reviews are done by medical and non-medical persons once all information is obtained to determine level of discipline, if any.
    • The complaint review process can take up to six (6) months or more.
  • Will my provider dismiss me as a patient if I file a complaint?

    The Board has found that some licensees choose to dismiss patients who file complaints.  Provided they follow all appropriate laws and guidelines, this is within the provider’s rights.

  • Will filing a complaint resolve the problem I have with my provider?

    Most likely, no.  The Board does not intervene on behalf of individual patients.  Rather, it acts for the people of North Carolina at large.  When the Board takes action against a provider, that action is aimed at preventing future problems and protecting future patients.  Your complaint, therefore, can play a significant part in protecting the people of North Carolina from incompetent, unqualified, or unethical practitioners.

  • What are some examples of issues the Medical Board cannot address through the complaint process?

    Many issues that are important to consumers do not fall within the Board’s jurisdiction because no violation of the Medical Practice Act is present. Dismissal from a medical practice, provided it complies with Board guidelines, does not violate the Act. Many financial and interpersonal issues also are outside the Board’s reach. The Board cannot help a patient sue a provider for money, settle fee disputes, resolve issues about disability ratings and compensation or mediate personality conflicts among patients, doctors and office staff.

  • What kinds of issues can the Medical Board address through the complaint process?

    The Board is authorized to act only on complaints that may involve a violation of the Medical Practice Act, a state law that covers a wide range of misconduct.  Three types of cases account for more than half of the Board’s public actions against providers: quality of care, prescribing (either self-prescribing or improperly prescribing to others) and cases where a provider is impaired due to alcohol or substance abuse.  Many other disciplinary cases fall under the broad category of “unprofessional or unethical conduct”, such as violating patient confidentiality, misrepresenting professional credentials or practicing without an active medical license.  Problems with medical recordkeeping and sexual misconduct or other boundary violations account for many cases as well.

back to Complaints

Consumer Info

  • What is the correct mailing address for the Board?

    You may use either the Board’s street address or P.O. Box address to send mail to the Board. However, if you are sending a package or envelope via FedEx, you MUST send it to the street address.

    The Board’s street address is:

    1203 Front Street
    Raleigh, NC, 27609-7533

    The Board’s P.O. Box address is:

    P.O. Box 20007
    Raleigh, NC, 27619-0007

  • What is a doctor of osteopathic medicine (DO)?

    A doctor of osteopathic medicine, or DO, is a specific type of physician.  A DO degree is equivalent, though different in certain aspects, to a medical degree (MD). Both medical doctors and doctors of osteopathic medicine complete four years of medical education and both complete between three and six years of graduate medical education (residency training) depending on the chosen specialty. Both types of physicians must pass comparable examinations as a condition of licensure.

    The main distinction between DOs and MDs is that, in addition to traditional medical training, osteopathic physicians receive extensive training in the body’s musculoskeletal system. This is the interconnected system of nerves, muscles and bones that make up two-thirds of a person’s body mass. According to the American Osteopathic Association, osteopathic manipulative treatment or OMT is incorporated into the training and practice of osteopathic physicians. With OMT, osteopathic physicians use their hands to diagnose illness and injury. Finally, most osteopathic physicians specialize in primary care, including pediatrics, family practice, obstetrics and gynecology and internal medicine.

  • What types of punishment do publicly disciplined providers receive?

    The Board is authorized to mete out a wide range of public disciplinary actions that limit, suspend or even revoke the right to practice. A medical license is revoked only in the most serious cases where the provider’s conduct or level of competence is considered to pose a significant threat to public health and safety. Far more often, the Board acts to restrict the license by imposing conditions aimed at preventing future problems. For example, a physician disciplined for prescribing narcotic painkillers without adequately documenting the need or taking steps to prevent addiction might be barred from prescribing such drugs for a set period and required to complete continuing medical education on managing chronic pain. In some cases, the Board determines no action against the provider’s license is warranted but issues a public letter of concern. All final disciplinary actions are noted on the Board’s Web site.

  • How often does a complaint result in the Board taking formal disciplinary action against a provider?

    Only about one percent of the 1,200 complaints received annually result in public action being taken against the provider’s license. Often when no action is taken, it is because no violation of the Medical Practice Act has occurred and the matter is therefore not actionable. In another 30 percent of cases, the complaint leads to private discipline, such as a confidential letter expressing the Board’s concern and cautioning against similar conduct in future.  When no formal action is taken, the Board keeps a copy of the complaint in its permanent file.  This file is an important resource that helps the Board track providers over time and detect patterns of behavior that might warrant future intervention.

  • What are the possible outcomes of a complaint?

    Complaints are most often resolved in one of three ways.

    • No formal action. Typically, this is the result when no violation of the Medical Practice Act has occurred. However, the provider is notified and the information is kept on file. This allows the Board to spot recurrent issues or a pattern of behavior that may cause the Board to intervene in future.
    • Private action is taken. There may be no violation of the Medical Practice Act that warrants public action, but the Board is nonetheless concerned about some aspect of the provider’s conduct or performance. In such cases, the Board takes private action, such as a confidential letter of concern to the provider that cautions against repeating similar conduct.  Alternatively, licensees may be brought before the Board for a private interview. The contents of the letter or interview are confidential.
    • Public action is taken. In these cases, the Board determines there was a violation of the Medical Practice Act and takes formal public action. For example, this may be in the form of a public letter of concern, an order imposing conditions or restrictions on the license, a suspension of the licensee’s authority to practice or some other type of action.
  • Once I file my complaint, what happens?

    Here is a brief description of the complaint review process:

    • Complaints are generally acknowledged within 2 weeks via USPS.
    •  
    • All complaints are initially reviewed to determine if there is a possible violation of the Medical Practice Act that rises to the level of further inquiry.
    • If the conduct that prompted the complaint is not found to be a violation of the Medical Practice Act, you are informed of this in your initial letter and the case is closed.  However, the licensee is informed of your complaint and the information is kept on file.
    • If a possible violation has occurred and further inquiry is warranted through the Complaint Department a copy of your complaint is sent to the licensee for review and response to the Board; medical records are obtained as necessary.
    • Typically your written complaint serves as your full statement and you will not be contacted by the Board unless clarification or additional information is needed.
    • Case reviews are done by medical and non-medical persons once all information is obtained to determine level of discipline, if any.
    • The complaint review process can take up to six (6) months or more.
  • Will my provider dismiss me as a patient if I file a complaint?

    The Board has found that some licensees choose to dismiss patients who file complaints.  Provided they follow all appropriate laws and guidelines, this is within the provider’s rights.

  • Will filing a complaint resolve the problem I have with my provider?

    Most likely, no.  The Board does not intervene on behalf of individual patients.  Rather, it acts for the people of North Carolina at large.  When the Board takes action against a provider, that action is aimed at preventing future problems and protecting future patients.  Your complaint, therefore, can play a significant part in protecting the people of North Carolina from incompetent, unqualified, or unethical practitioners.

  • What are some examples of issues the Medical Board cannot address through the complaint process?

    Many issues that are important to consumers do not fall within the Board’s jurisdiction because no violation of the Medical Practice Act is present. Dismissal from a medical practice, provided it complies with Board guidelines, does not violate the Act. Many financial and interpersonal issues also are outside the Board’s reach. The Board cannot help a patient sue a provider for money, settle fee disputes, resolve issues about disability ratings and compensation or mediate personality conflicts among patients, doctors and office staff.

  • What kinds of issues can the Medical Board address through the complaint process?

    The Board is authorized to act only on complaints that may involve a violation of the Medical Practice Act, a state law that covers a wide range of misconduct.  Three types of cases account for more than half of the Board’s public actions against providers: quality of care, prescribing (either self-prescribing or improperly prescribing to others) and cases where a provider is impaired due to alcohol or substance abuse.  Many other disciplinary cases fall under the broad category of “unprofessional or unethical conduct”, such as violating patient confidentiality, misrepresenting professional credentials or practicing without an active medical license.  Problems with medical recordkeeping and sexual misconduct or other boundary violations account for many cases as well.

  • What medical professionals does the Board license and regulate?

    The Board issues licenses to medical doctors (MDs), doctors of osteopathic medicine (DOs), physician assistants (PAs), certified clinical perfusionists and anesthesiologist assistants, and regulates their practice. It approves the practice of nurse practitioners and clinical pharmacist practitioners and jointly regulates those professions with the NC Board of Nursing and NC Board of Pharmacy, respectively.

  • If a licensee has a public file, does that mean he or she has been disciplined by the Board?

    Not always. For example, each year the Board executes several “re-entry agreements” with physicians and physician assistants who have no history of discipline or impairment. Such agreements are required when a physician or PA seeks to reactivate his or her license after spending two or more years out of active clinical practice. The agreement sets out the terms and conditions under which the licensee will transition back into active practice. The agreement is binding on the licensee and is a public document, but it is not disciplinary in nature. The best way to tell if a licensee with a “public file” has been disciplined is to look at the public documents available through the licensee’s profile page.

back to Consumer Info

Continuing Medical Education (CME)

  • This is my very first renewal. How do I enter my CME?

    You are exempt for your very first renewal because your CME cycle does not start until the first birthday following initial licensure.

    Example: Your license is granted on August 1, 2013,  and your birthday is December 1st.  When you renew in December you would click “exempt” for CME on this first renewal.  Start recording your CME hours from your birthday, 12/1/13 .  Your 3 year cycle will run from 12/1/13 -  12/1/16 and you will need a total of 60 hours of CME during that 3 year cycle.  There is no minimum that must be earned/reported per year.

  • What is the CME requirement under the revised CME rules that went into effect August 1, 2012?

    The revised CME rules eliminate the requirement to report ANY Category 2 CME hours while maintaining the requirement to earn a minimum of 60 Category 1 CME hours over a three-year period.

  • How many CME hours do I get for passing an initial special board certification examination?

    A licensee who obtains initial certification from an ABMS, AOA or RCPSC specialty board shall be deemed to have satisfied his or her CME requirement in full for the three year cycle in which the board certificate is obtained. Licensees who obtain initial certification will indicate that they are exempt from the CME requirement during annual renewal by selecting “exempt.”

  • What if I continue to earn Category 2 CME hours?

    Category 2 CME hours are no longer required and may not be counted to satisfy the CME requirements. The Board encourages licensees to continue to complete CME, whether Category 1 or 2 hours, above and beyond the minimum required, as their time permits. Many Category 2 CME activities may be useful to licensees.

  • Are any physician licensees exempt from CME requirements in NC?

    Yes. Four distinct groups of licensees may qualify for an exemption to the requirements. They are listed below.

    1. MOC/recertification exemption Physicians who are currently engaged in a program of recertification or maintenance of certification (MOC) through an ABMS, AOA or RCPSC specialty board shall be exempt from reporting CME to the NC Medical Board for the three year cycle in which they are involved in recertification/MOC. Licensees who qualify for this exemption will indicate this during annual renewal by selecting “exempt.” There are some important exceptions to this exemption; Physicians who have been “grandfathered” or awarded lifetime certfication by an ABMS, AOA or RCPSC specialty board SHALL NOT qualify for the exemption and will be required to report CME.

    2. Initial certification exemption A licensee who obtains initial certification from an ABMS, AOA or RCPSC specialty board shall be deemed to have satisfied the CME requirement for the three-year cycle in which initial certification was obtained. Licensees who qualify for this exemption will indicate this during annual renewal by selecting “exempt.”

    3. Military service exemption Physicians who are in good standing with the Board, serving in the armed forces of the United States or serving in support of such armed forces, and serving in a combat zone, or serving with respect to a military contingency operation as defined by 10 U.S.C. 101(a)(13) will be exempt from reporting CME. Licensees who qualify for this exemption will indicate this during annual renewal by selecting “exempt.”

    4. NC legislative service exemption Physicians who are currently serving as members of the NC General Assembly’s House or Senate Health committees will be exempt from reporting CME hours. These licensees will indicate their exemption during annual renewal by selecting “exempt.”

  • Where can I view my current CME hours?

    Your current CME hours can be accessed on our website. Visit www.ncmedboard.org and click on “Update Licensee Info Page” in the green Quick Links menu on the right. Log in using your FileID# and date of birth. The tab “Preferences/CME” will allow you to view the CME hours in your current three-year cycle.

    If you have questions or need to make changes, please .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

  • How long must I keep my CME documentation?

    All CME documentation should be kept for 6 years.

  • What do I do if my CME cycle is not showing up correctly when I check it during my annual renewal?

    Please complete your renewal, and then email the Board. Click here and select “Questions about Annual Renewal” to send your message to the correct department. Corrections to the CME cycle or hours from previous years can be made after the renewal is complete.

  • When does my CME cycle start?

    Your 3 year cycle depends on when you were licensed.  The 3 year cycle shall run from the physician’s birthday beginning in the year 2001 or the first birthday following initial licensure, whichever occurs later.

  • I am a resident or fellow. How do I record my CME?

    Residents and Fellows who are enrolled in ACGME- or AOA-accredited graduate medical education programs are exempt from the requirement, until the first birthday following completion of their training program.  During your online renewal there is an EXEMPT box to check, which will reset your CME cycle.

  • What if I have additional questions about CME that are not answered on the Board’s website?

    Please send your questions via .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  to the Board’s renewal department.

  • If I am retired and/or have a volunteer license, do I still need to comply with the CME rule?

    Yes. As long as you have an active license to practice medicine in the state of North Carolina you are subject to the CME rule, which requires 60 hours of Category 1 CME over a 3 year period.

  • Is there a minimum total of CME hours that must be earned in a given year?

    No. Licensees must ensure that they earn a total of 60 Category 1 CME hours by the end of the current three-year cycle.

  • May I use the Physician’s Recognition Award for reporting CME?

    Any hours that you put in to receive the Physician’s Recognition Award that also qualify as relevant may be used. The Physician’s Recognition Award and similar awards, taken by themselves, cannot be accepted as documentation.

  • May I roll excess CME hours over to the next three-year cycle?

    No. The CME hours earned within a three-year cycle can be used only to fulfill the requirements for that cycle.

  • Must I submit documentation to the Board?

    Licensees should not mail CME documentation to the Board unless specifically asked to. Please maintain your own CME records, so that you can furnish them to the Board in the event of a CME audit. You will report hours annually during the license renewal process.

back to Continuing Medical Education (CME)

Disciplinary Process

  • How can I access public documents related to pending or closed NCMB disciplinary cases?

    Public documents are most easily accessed via the Board’s web site. All public documents associated with a particular licensee are listed at the bottom of the licensee’s information page, which may be viewed using the “Look Up a Licensee” tool on this web site. Documents will be listed in the order posted and may be printed or downloaded from the Board’s site. Certain documents, such as hearing transcripts, may not be available via the web site but they are available to the public. .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  for assistance in obtaining copies of transcripts.

  • When does a disciplinary case against a particular licensee of the Board become public?

    Typically, a disciplinary case first becomes public information when the Board issues a notice of charges and allegations, a legal document that states the Board’s case against the licensee and provides certain details of the evidence the Board has gathered in the case. Once charges are issued, a public hearing is typically held and, after hearing both sides of the case, the Board determines what discipline, if any, is warranted. Alternatively, a case in which charges have been issued may be resolved with a consent order, which is a negotiated settlement that resolves the case without the need for a hearing. Consent orders are presented for the Board’s consideration in open session

    A significant number of cases are resolved before the Board takes the step of issuing formal charges and allegations. In such cases, the case becomes public when Board attorneys, and the counsel for the licensee involved, present the terms of the consent order to the Board for consideration and possible approval.

  • Who prosecutes disciplinary cases on behalf of the Board?

    The Board employs a full time Legal Department, which currently employs five attorneys, including the department director, and three legal assistants. The Legal Department prepares charges and allegations against licensees and prosecutes cases the Board has voted to pursue. The department also assists other Board staff in following licensees who have entered into consent orders (negotiated settlements) with the Board or who have accepted other conditions or discipline to resolve a case to ensure compliance.

back to Disciplinary Process

License Application

  • USMLE and COMLEX: Is there a limit on the number of attempts to pass?

    Yes. You must pass each step within three attempts (Step 1, Step 2 Part A, Step 2 Part B, Step 3). However, this requirement can be waived IF the applicant can show proof of being certified/recertified by an approved specialty board within the past 10 years. To document certification/recertification, send a photocopy of supporting document(s) to the NCMB Licensing Department.

  • Can I use electronic fingerprinting to complete the fingerprinting requirement?

    Yes, only if you are having your fingerprinting completed in NC.

  • Is it okay to fill out a license application online using a mobile device?

    No, it is not recommended. Mobile devices are not supported at this time.

  • I completed the FCVS application. Do I also need to complete the NCMB application?

    Yes.

  • Why can’t I log back into my application to make changes or update information?

    Once payment has been made on your application, you will not be allowed to make any changes to your application.  All changes and/or additions should be .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)to the Licensing Department.

  • How do I know if my medical school qualifies for licensure?

    The NCMB does not have a list of approved or disapproved schools.

  • Does NC offer a teleradiology license?

    No.  Physicians wanting to practice teleradiology will need to obtain a full license

  • Will I need a personal interview?

    It will be detemined upon completion of the application as to whether a physician will be required to appear for a personal interview.

  • How long will it take to get my license?

    You should not expect the application process to take less than four months.  Processing time will take longer during the months of March through August, due to the increased number of residents and relocating physicians.  We recommend you allow four to six months of total processing time if you wish to be granted a license during these months.

    The following lists common reasons a license approval may take longer:

    • Forms submitted by the applicant are not completed correctly and must be resubmitted.
    • The fingerprint cards and authority to release form were not sent to the NCMB in a timely manner.
    • One or more of the items mailed to the NCMB never reached us.
  • What do I do with the State of Connecticut form?

    If you have a Connecticut license, complete the form and forward to the Connecticut Medical Board.

  • You have two mailing addresses, which one should I use?

    You should always send mail to the PO Box address unless you are sending the information via overnight delivery.

  • Can I fax documents to the Board to include in my application?

    Fax documents are not permitted unless prior permission has been given by the license department.

  • What is the best way for me to check the status of my application?

    You can check the status of your online application by clicking the “check status” link on the website.

  • What if an item on my check status is marked not received but the items does not apply to me?

    You should send an e-mail to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)and advise which requirement states not received and that it’s not applicable to you.

  • If I’m applying for a full license, do I still need to register my training license?

    Yes. North Carolina law requires that physicians register their license within thirty days of their birthday each year.

  • How do I find out if I’m registered with FCVS (Federation Credentials Verification Service)?

    You should contact their office at 817-868-4000 or www.fsmb.org/fcvs.html

  • Do I need to obtain a license verification if I have only held training licenses?

    The NC Medical Board does not require verification of training licenses.

  • Does the NC Medical Board issue a locum tenens license?

    No.

  • Does the NC Medical Board issue temporary licenses?

    No.

  • How do I convert my resident training license to a full license?

    You will need to complete the full physician license application online.

  • Where do I send the fingerprint cards?

    Fingerprint cards and the authority to release information form should be sent to the NC Medical Board together.  Fingerprint cards cannot be forwarded to the appropriate agency until the online application fee has been paid.

  • How do I get the fingerprint cards required for my background check and where do I get them filled out?

    Send an e-mail to the .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  and provide your mailing address.  When you receive the cards from us, go to your local law enforcement agency, have them filled out and mail them back to the NCMB.

  • Does North Carolina recognize medical licenses issued by any other states?

    No. North Carolina does not have “reciprocity” with any other states at this time. Physicians who wish to practice in North Carolina must obtain a license in this state.

back to License Application

License Renewal

  • This is my very first renewal. How do I enter my CME?

    You are exempt for your very first renewal because your CME cycle does not start until the first birthday following initial licensure.

    Example: Your license is granted on August 1, 2013,  and your birthday is December 1st.  When you renew in December you would click “exempt” for CME on this first renewal.  Start recording your CME hours from your birthday, 12/1/13 .  Your 3 year cycle will run from 12/1/13 -  12/1/16 and you will need a total of 60 hours of CME during that 3 year cycle.  There is no minimum that must be earned/reported per year.

  • Is it okay to complete my license renewal online using a mobile device?

    No, it is not recommended. Mobile devices are not supported at this time.

  • How do I get a copy of my receipt and certificate after renewing?

    Certificates are sent by email only. Once you complete your online renewal, you will receive two emails from the Board within 24 hours.  One email is your receipt and the other email is your certificate. The certificate is sent as an attachment and you will need Adobe Reader (a free program) to open it. You can save the certificate on your computer and print it out, if you wish to carry the wallet card section with you.

    If you do not receive your certificate or receipt after 24 hours, go to http://www.ncmedboard.org  Go to the green Quick Links box at the right of the Home Page and select Download Renewal Certificate/Receipt. Click on the green “start” button in the middle of the page that opens and follow prompts to enter your File ID #and DOB to log in.  You will be able to click on either the certificate or receipt (one at a time - you may not print both documents at once) and then you can print off the screen.

    If you have any trouble retrieving your receipt or certificate off the website, send an email to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  Include your name and File ID # so we may identify and help you.

  • Is there a grace period to renew my RTL?

    NCMB policy allows a 30 day grace period (e.g. the licensee must renew within 30 days of his or her birthday). Residents should check with their training institution because many require that you renew your Resident Training license on or before your due date to continue practicing in their facilities.

  • Where can I view my current CME hours?

    Your current CME hours can be accessed on our website. Visit www.ncmedboard.org and click on “Update Licensee Info Page” in the green Quick Links menu on the right. Log in using your FileID# and date of birth. The tab “Preferences/CME” will allow you to view the CME hours in your current three-year cycle.

    If you have questions or need to make changes, please .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

  • If I’m applying for a full license, do I still need to register my training license?

    Yes. North Carolina law requires that physicians register their license within thirty days of their birthday each year.

  • How do I make my license inactive and what does that mean in NC?

    To request that a license be placed on inactive status, send an email to the Board’s renewal coordinator, at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) Be sure to include your full name and license number in your email request for inactive status. You may also send us your request in writing via USPS. Send your letter to the North Carolina Medical Board, Registration, PO Box 20007, Raleigh , NC 27619-0007. To download a copy of the form used to request inactive status, click here.

    ALL licensees are strongly urged to understand the implications of going inactive before taking this step. Practitioners with inactive licenses are not required to renew annually with the Board or to pay the annual renewal fee. Inactive practitioners MAY NOT practice medicine or surgery, write prescriptions or administer prescription drugs in NC under any circumstances.

    To reinstate an inactive license, it is typically necessary to apply to the Board, meet the current licensing requirements and pay the full licensing fee, which is currently $392.75 for MD/DO licensees. This fee includes $38.00 for a criminal background check. If there has been an interruption in the continuous, clinical practice of medicine greater than two (2) years, the applicant must reestablish his or her competence to practice medicine safely to the Board’s satisfaction.  Click here to read the Board’s position on re-entering the practice of medicine.

    Before making any decision about going inactive, the Board recommends that licensees thoroughly familiarize themselves with the requirements of reactivating or reinstating a license, including the possible need for a plan of reentry. Please read the related FAQs on reactivating and reinstating licenses. For additional information, check the license application requirements for reactivation and reinstatement. This content can be found in the Licensing section of this website.

     

  • Why won’t the online renewal form accept my CME entries?

    CME hours must be reported in a certain way for the database to recognize them. Use only whole numbers (no decimals) when entering your CME hours. Do not add any additional text.

  • I am trying to indicate hospital privileges, but my NC hospital is not among the available choices.

    You may inform the NC Medical Board by filling out the survey at the end of the renewal process or by e-mailing the renewal department.

  • I live out of state and cannot enter my hospital privileges

    Only North Carolina residents are required to enter hospital privileges.

  • I live out of state. Why can’t I enter my county?

    Only licensees who practice in North Carolina are required to enter their county.

  • How long does it take to process a license renewal?

    Online renewals are processed immediately. You can verify that your renewal went through by simply going to “Look Up a Licensee” on the Board’s website. Enter your name and then click on the details page link. If the “annual renewal” date has been updated your registration has successfully gone through.

  • I am a licensee and I am going out of the country for a year. May I renew my license early?

    Yes, but if it is more than 60 days before your next birthday, you must contact the renewal department.

  • I failed to renew my license on time. Is my license made inactive immediately?

    No. If you have not registered on time, a late fee is added 30 days after your renewal date and a certified letter will be sent to your mailing address on file with the Board. You will have an additional 30 days from the date of receipt of this letter (as evidenced by the return receipt) to renew. If your renewal has not been completed online within this time period, your license will be placed on inactive status. It is unlawful to practice with an inactive license.

  • I just received my medical license and my birthday is next week. Do I have to renew my license?

    Yes. All active licensees in NC must register their license every year within 30 days of their birthday. This requirement applies even if the license is issued shortly before the birthday. The licensee must pay the annual renewal fee in addition to the license application fee.

back to License Renewal

Licensee Information Page

  • Where can I view my current CME hours?

    Your current CME hours can be accessed on our website. Visit www.ncmedboard.org and click on “Update Licensee Info Page” in the green Quick Links menu on the right. Log in using your FileID# and date of birth. The tab “Preferences/CME” will allow you to view the CME hours in your current three-year cycle.

    If you have questions or need to make changes, please .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

  • I am having trouble opening a Public file. I only see the first page.

    The file is probably being opened by QuickTime. You need to uncheck the TIFF Mime Type in QuickTime. In QuickTime, click on: Edit, then Preferences, then QuickTime Preferences, then Browser(tab), then Mime Settings…(button), then Images - Still images files and then TIFF. This should allow you to view the entire document.

  • Is there a limit in the number of publications I enter on the Publications page?

    Licensees are asked to limit their cited publications to peer reviewed published work; choose articles that are clearly indicative of expertise in your area of practice.

  • I do not have a practice address. Does this mean my home address will be published?

    No, the address you select as ‘public’ will appear on our website.  If you select the practice address to be public and there is no data entered, the city and state from your home address will be posted.

  • I recently renewed my license, so you should have all the required information. Do I need to enter the data again for the Licensee Information pages?

    No, the information you entered during the renewal process will appear on your Licensee Information Pages.  However, you have the opportunity to enter additional information on your Licensee Information Pages to market yourself and your practice.  If any required information changes, you must update that information on your Licensee Information Pages within 60 days.  A list of required information can be accessed through the Licensee Information login screen.

  • I would prefer that my email address not be public.  Do I need to remove this from my Address page?

    No.  Email addresses will not be posted on the Board’s public website. See the note on the Address pages, which reads: “Your public address (except for email) will be visible to the public on the Board’s website.”

  • Where can I find my File ID number?

    To retrieve your File ID number go to the Licensee Information Update log in page. On the bottom right side of this page click the “Recover File ID” button. A window will appear asking your Social Security Number and Date of Birth.

  • Can I provide my information over the telephone or submit it in writing?

    No, you are required to enter your information online through the North Carolina Medical Board’s website. We will not supply forms for you to complete.

  • Who can I contact if I need assistance?

    You may email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

  • What happens if I don’t update my Licensee Information page?

    Failure to provide the required information by licensees to the Board may constitute unprofessional conduct and could result in disciplinary action pursuant to NCGS 90-5.2.  We recommend you review and update the data on your Licensee Information Pages to insure complete and accurate information will be published on the Board’s website.

  • Do I need to report malpractice cases that happened prior to May 1, 2008?

    Yes. You are required to list all malpractice cases that resulted in a judgment, award, payment or settlement. However, only payments that occurred on or after May 1, 2008 will be public. If the payment was made as part of a settlement that occurred on or after May 1, 2008, only settlements of $75,000 or more will be public.

  • I do not have any public actions, felonies, malpractice, misdemeanor convictions or privileges suspended but I do not see a space where I can enter "not applicable". What should I enter?

    Any page that is not applicable, please leave blank.

  • After I fill out a page and click "Apply", nothing happens. The system will not allow me to move to the next page. Why?

    If you do not get a message stating “Your changes have been successfully applied”, you should review the top of the page for any error messages in red.  An error message alerts you to any corrections that may be required to complete the page.

  • I was interrupted while entering my information and when I returned to my computer, I was not able to apply/save the information I had been entering. What went wrong and what should I do?

    The Licensee Information system is programmed to time out in 20 minutes. If you need to step away for a while, click on “Apply” at the bottom of the page to save the information you have entered. After the system has timed out you will need to log back in to continue. It may be necessary to close your Web browser and relaunch it before logging back in.

  • How do I change some of the information I entered for my Licensee Information Page?

    You may log in to the NCMB Licensee Information system as often as needed to add new information or to make changes. The Licensee Information system is available to you 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

  • How do I log into my Licensee Information Page?

    Go to www.ncmedboard.org and click on “Update Licensee Info Page” which is the second item listed in the green “Quick Links” column on the right.  You will be prompted to provide your File ID and your Date of Birth.  Then click on the Login button.

back to Licensee Information Page

Perfusionist

  • Why does the licensing process take so long?

    Sometimes we receive information from the SBI background check that wasn’t indicated on the application. When this occurs, the applicant is required to send in additional information/materials.  There are also documents (such as reference forms & education certification forms) that must be submitted by other individuals and agencies. The licensure process for perfusionists is:

    1. Application is submitted.
    2. Application is processed (biographical data is entered into our system & fingerprint cards are submitted to the SBI).
    3. Once the application is complete (license verifications, databank queries, SBI report and all other requested information has been received) the application is sent to Perfusionist Advisory   Committee (PAC) member for review.
    4. If the application or SBI report reveals negative information, the applicant may be asked to come for an interview with the PAC.
    5. The applicant is then placed on the vote list for the next meeting of the PAC.
    6. If approved by the PAC, the applicant’s name will then be placed on the vote list for the next meeting of the North Carolina Medical Board (NCMB) - extracted

  • Do I need a supervising perfusionist?

    If you have applied for a provisional perfusionist license you will need a supervising perfusionist. You will be required to complete and submit a Designation of Supervising Perfusionist form.

  • I have a provisional perfusionist license. How do I get a full unrestricted license?

    Once you have passed the exams for certification, have the American Board of Cardiovascular Perfusion (ABCP) send us verification. They may require a fee for this. You will also need to submit a written request and the required NCMB fee to have your provisional license converted to a full license.

  • How do I get my Education Certification form completed if my school/program has closed?

    Those schools and programs that closed probably have an agency or person that still possesses transcripts of the student who attended the program. If a school or program has closed and there is no way to obtain transcripts from some other source, then the applicant should contact the American Board of Cardiovascular Perfusion (ABCP), since the perfusionists have to provide transcripts to that certification agency.  If all of that fails, then you will need to submit a statement to the PAC stating that you are not able to obtain transcripts.

back to Perfusionist

Physician Assistant

  • Do PAs need to meet face-to-face with their primary supervising physician for quality improvement meetings?

    No. The NCMB accepts electronic communication between a PA and his or her primary supervising physician as valid quality improvement meetings as long as the spirit of Rule 21 NCAC 32S.0213 (d) Supervision of Physician Assistants is satisfied.

  • I lost my primary supervising physician on short notice. What should I do?

    The Board has an emergency policy to cover these situations. It involves notifying the Board within two days of the loss of supervisor and securing a new primary while practicing during a 30-day grace period. Read the official policy.

  • Are PAs required to recertify in order to keep their NC PA licenses active?

    No. Currently, PAs are required to be NCCPA certified at initial licensure but are not required to recertify to keep their NC licenses active.

  • What kind of work can a PA who has graduated but is not yet licensed do?

    A PA may shadow and do anything else a lay, unlicensed person can do in a physician’s office. They may not, under any circumstances, perform medical acts without an active NC PA license.

  • I need a copy of my Intent to Practice acknowledgement letter. Can the Board provide me with one?

    No. The Board understands that PAs and/or thier employers require a copy of the Intent to Practice acknowledgement letter to provide evidence of the physician assistant/supervising physician relationship for various credentialing purposes, including participation in federal programs such as Medicaid and Medicare. 

    When a physician assistant completes the Board’s online Intent to Practice (ITP) form, which establishes a physician assistant/supervising physician relationship, an acknowledgement letter confirming that relationship is sent to the primary supervising physician; a copy of the letter is also mailed to the physician assistant. It is the physician assistant’s responsibility to keep a copy of the acknowledgement letter at all places where the physician assistant practices. Since instituting the online ITP process, the Board has not maintained copies of the acknowledgement letters and, thus, is unable to provide additional copies. Requests for copies of ITP letters will not be processed.

    What if I am unable to find my ITP letter? 

    The information provided on the Board’s website may serve as an official confirmation of the physician assistant/supervising physician relationship.  For example, if the Board’s website indicates that a physician assistant is currently being supervised by a particular physician, that indication is an official acknowledgement from the Board of that particular physician assistant/supervising physician relationship. The Board advises anyone not in possession of a written acknowledgement letter to use the information from the website in its place.

    To find information about a particular physician assistant’s supervisory relationship, enter the physician assistant’s name using the “Look Up a Licensee” tool available on this website. To enter a name, click on “Look Up a Licensee” in the green Quick Links box on the right side of the Home Page.

  • Can a PA prescribe controlled substances within U.S. DEA rule and not violate the Board's PA prescribing rules?

    Yes, CFR 1306.12 prohibits the refilling of schedule II controlled susbstances. PA rule 21 NCAC 32S .0212(4) mandates that a PA can only prescribe a 30 day supply for schedules II, IIN, III, and IIIN.

  • Do NC rules for PAs apply to those employed by the federal government and working in a federal facility?

    The federal government may employ a PA to work in a federal facility in North Carolina without requiring the PA to hold a NC license. However, many PAs employed by the federal government and working in federal facilities do hold an active NC license.

    Federally employed PAs are governed by federal rules and regulations in regard to how they practice while working within federal facilities. However, a federally employed PA who holds a NC license and wants to maintain the license must comply with NC rules that pertain to maintaining an active license (i.e. annual renewal, CME and payment of fees). Also, any PA who carries a NC license is expected to practice competently, act professionally and be of requisite good character no matter where, or for whom, he or she works.  PAs employed by federal facilities are not required to submit an Intent to Practice Form with the Board prior to beginning their practice at the federal facility.

  • I haven’t received any information, where was it sent?

    The Board sends information to the address you provide on your application. It is important to maintain a current address in order to receive correspondence from the Board. You can easily change your address online.

  • I completed my Intent to Practice form, when can I begin practicing?

    You must see “active” under your name and the primary supervising physician’s name along with the date on the website in order to begin practicing. A letter will be mailed to you and the primary supervising physician within two business days. You and your supervising physician(s) must keep a copy of this Intent to Practice Acknowledgement Letter at all practice sites.

  • What’s the best way to complete the Intent to Practice form?

    Intent to Practice forms are processed on the Board’s website.  As soon as you complete the form you will be able to view the information on the website under your name. If the primary supervising physician is not displayed as “active” but rather says “pending,” this may be because the PA, physician or both have a public file/other issues. These types of Intent to Practice forms may take longer to process.

    Be sure to use correct grammer and punctuation and include the full site address when completing this form. Failure to do so may delay processing.

  • Can I submit my application if information is missing?

    You may send your completed PA application, two fingerprint cards and Authority to Release Information form to the Board before sending other items, such as reference letters, etc.

  • How many PAs are licensed in North Carolina?

    There are appoximately 5,000 PAs licensed to practice in North Carolina.

  • Can third parties contact NCMB for information on the status of a pending PA license application?

    No. NCMB cannot share applicant information with anyone except the applicant.

  • May a physician assistant supervise a physician in a resident training program?

    No.A physician in a resident training program must be supervised by a fully licensed physician.

  • Does the supervising physician have to cosign inpatient chart entries made by a PA?

    No, this is not required under state law or by the NCMB. However, PA entries into inpatient charts (hospital, long-term care facilities) must comply with the institution’s rules and regulations. This means that any given supervising physician, medical practice, hospital or medical facility is free to impose its own guidelines, including co-signing of patient charts, and the physician assistant is expected to comply with that physician’s or institution’s rules and regulations.

  • How often must a supervising physician meet with the PA?

    First six months of new supervisory arrangement: The primary supervising physician and the PA in a new practice arrangement must meet monthly for first six months to discuss relevant clinical problems and quality improvement measures.

    After first six months: The primary supervising physician and PA must meet at least every six months to discuss relevant clinical problems and quality improvement measures.
    A record of all of these meetings must be signed and dated by both primary supervising physician and PA and be available for NCMB representative inspection.

  • Is the supervising physician responsible for the PA’s medical acts?

    Yes, the primary supervising physician retains professional responsibility for the care rendered by the PA within the scope of his or her individualized supervisory arrangement.

    The PA is an agent of his or her primary supervising physicians in the performance of all medical practice related activities, including ordering of diagnostic, therapeutic and other medical services within the scope of his or her individualized supervisory arrangement.

    The back-up supervising physician is responsible for the medical acts performed by the physician assistant only when the back-up supervising physician is actively supervising the PA.

  • Is on-site, physical presence of supervising physician required at all times the PA is practicing?

    No. However, PAs may not practice without a primary supervising physician in place. Physician and PA teams must ensure that the PA’s scope of practice is identified, that the delegation of medical tasks is appropriate to the skills of the supervising physician as well as the PA’s competence level, and that the relationship of, and access to, each supervising physician is defined, and that the PA’s performance evaluation process is established.

  • How many supervising physicians are required to be designated for each PA?

    A PA is only required to have one primary supervising physician. The primary supervising physician is the physician who accepts full responsibility and liability for the PA’s medical activities and professional conduct at all times, whether the physician personally is providing supervision or supervision is being provided by a back-up supervising physician.

    A physician assistant is not required to have a back-up supervising physician but is encouraged to have one during those times a primary supervising physician may not be readily available. The back-up supervising physician is the physician who accepts responsibility for supervision of PA’s activities in absence of primary supervising physician. The back-up supervising physician is responsible and liable for PA’s activities ONLY when providing supervision.

    All supervising physicians must be licensed by NCMB and not prohibited from supervising PAs. Primary and back-up supervising physicians must ensure PA has adequate back-up for any procedure performed by PA in any practice location (office, home, hospital, etc.).

  • What written form of “Supervisory Arrangement” is required between a PA and supervising physician?

    A supervisory arrangement is a written statement that describes medical acts, tasks and functions (including prescriptive authority instructions) delegated to the PA by the primary supervising physician appropriate to the PA’s qualification, training, skill and competence. The primary supervising physician and the PA must sign and date the supervisory arrangement, keep it on file at all practice sites and make it available to the Board if requested.

    If there is a back-up supervising physician, they are required to complete the back-up supervising physician form. This form must be signed and dated by the back-up supervising physician, primary supervising physician and the PA.  This form must be kept onsite as a part of the supervisory arrangement.

  • What is meant by “scope of practice”?

    A PA’s scope of practice includes those medical acts, tasks or functions, including prescribing and dispensing of drugs and medical devices, that are delegated by the supervising physician in his or her individualized supervisory arrangement.

  • If I fail to renew my license, how much time do I have before my license is made inactive?

    All active licensees in NC must register their license no later than 30 days after their birthday. After 30 days, if you have not registered, then you will be sent a certified return receipt letter stating that you have 30 days from the date of receipt to register (as evidenced by the return receipt). It is during the second 30 days you must pay the late fee. If your registration is not received within this period your license will be placed on inactive status.

  • Does a PA need to renew his or her license every year?

    Yes. All active PA licensees must renew annually within 30 days of their birthdays.

  • How many PAs can a physician supervise?

    There is no specific limit. However, the supervising physician is expected to provide adequate supervision and comply with all applicable laws and rules.

  • My PA license was made inactive for failure to register. How do I reactivate/reinstate it?

    Reactivation Application: PAs whose licenses have been inactive one year or less due to failure to register and have no issues may complete the online reactivation application.

    Reinstatement Application: PAs with licenses that have been inactive for more than one year due to failure to register, or whose licenses have been suspended or revoked, should complete the online reinstatement application.

  • My birthday is now here. Do I need to pay the registration fee so soon after receiving my PA license?

    Yes. North Carolina law requires that physician assistants register with and pay a fee to the NCMB within thirty days of their birthday each year, no matter when the PA license is issued.

  • What does my PA badge need to read?

    When engaged in professional activities, PAs must wear a name tag consistent with N.C.G.S. 90-640.  It is acceptable for physician assistants to use the abbreviation “PA” on their badges.

  • Do I need to provide documentation of CME with my application and if so, how much?

    Applicants who graduated from a PA program two or more years ago must submit documentation of at least 100 hours of CME earned in the last two years. If it has been less than two years since your graduation, you are not required to submit CME.

  • Does the NCMB specify what medical tasks a PA may perform?

    No. The primary supervising physician must ensure that the PA’s scope of practice is clearly identified and that the delegation of the medical tasks is appropriate to the skills and competencies of both the supervising physician and the PA.

  • Do I need to put my PA license on inactive status if I no longer have a primary supervising MD?

    No, you need not place your license on inactive status; however, you are required to find a new primary supervising physician in order to practice, generally within 30 days. You will be required to successfully submit a new Intent to Practice form with the new supervising physician’s information in order to resume practice as a PA in NC.

  • Do I need to send NCMB a list of backup supervising physicians?

    No, but you are required to keep a backup supervising physician list at all practice sites of all backup supervising physicians. The lists must be signed and dated by each backup supervising physician, the primary supervising physician, and the PA.

  • Must I receive written acknowledgement of my Intent to Practice from NCMB before I may practice?

    The NCMB Website is considered primary source verification. If you look up your name on the Website and can see your name as active with the primary supervising physician’s name as active along with the date, you can begin practicing. Letters are processed and mailed out within two business days. The Intent to Practice Acknowledgement letter is sent to the physician assistant and the primary supervising physician. PAs and their primary supervising physician(s) should keep a copy of the Intent to Practice Acknowledgment letter at all practice sites.

  • How do I submit the Intent to Practice Form?

    As of January 2007, Intent to Practice forms are processed via the Board’s Website. Paper forms are no longer accepted. Processing via the website occurs in real time. As soon as the process has been completed you should be able to view the information on the website under your name. If your primary supervising physician is not showing as “active” but rather as “pending” this is because either the PA, the physician (or both) may have a public file or other issues. These types of Intent to Practice forms will take longer to review and process.

  • How many total reference letters are required for a PA application?

    The three reference forms included with the PA application are required. One must be from a physician and two must be from peers.  References cannot be from relatives or fellow students.

  • What could hold up my PA application and delay the issue of my license?

    Failure to submit a complete application is a major reason for delays. Please do not use nicknames and include all names used (i.e. first, middle, last, maiden, married, etc.).  Make sure the application is signed/dated/notarized correctly. Please send original forms.  Processing will NOT begin without a completed original application and paid fee.
     
    If you answer any of the screening questions with an affirmative answer, please send all original supporting documentation and request that the court(s) send their documentation/transcripts directly to the NCMB.  Please send the completed fingerprint cards (2) and the completed original Authority for Release of Information form as soon as possible. 

  • How long does it take for a PA application to be processed and a license to be issued?

    While each case is different, due to the volume of applicants, it is usually a three to four month process from the time of receipt by the NCMB for applications with no “yes” answers to the “red flag” questions on the application. Applications that have affirmative answers may or may not take longer based on the information received.

  • What is the PA application process?

    The PA completes the online application, pays the fee and sends the original, completed application with all the attachments. NCMB staff reviews the application and updates its database daily as information about credentials and education is received. It is the PA’s responsibility to check the status of their application online using the “Check Status” tool on this website to determine whether documents have been received by the Board.  The completed application is reviewed by a Board Member and the license may be issued, or an interview may be necessary, or the file may be added to the next Board Meeting schedule to be voted on.  Due to the amount of applications received, it may take three to four months to process your application.

    Helpful tips when completing your PA application:
    We can not begin to process your application without receiving the completed application and fee. Be sure the application is signed, dated and notarized correctly and that you send all original forms. Please include all names used (i.e. maiden, married, etc.), but do not include nicknames.

    If you answer any of the questions with an affirmative answer, send all original supporting documentation and request the court(s) send any documentation or transcripts directly.

    Please send your two fingerprint cards and the completed original Authority for Release of Information form as soon as possible.

    Finally, it is best to check the website to see if your license has been issued.

  • Do I need a primary supervising physician prior to applying for a PA license?

    No; however, you may not commence practice until you receive notification that your Intent to Practice form has been processed by the Board.

  • Does the NC Medical Board issue initial temporary licenses for PAs?

    No. PAs are required to have an active license and primary supervising physician acknowledgment (NCMB must have processed the Intent to Practice form) to practice as a PA in NC.

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Polysomnography Registration

  • Does a Sleep Tech/Polysomnographic Technologist have a license number?

    No. Sleep techs are registered,  not licensed, by the Board and as such have no license number. The number assigned to a polysomnographic technologist upon initial registration with the Board is a login number for use when registering each year.

  • Why is the NC Medical Board establishing a registry of polysomnographic technologists (commonly referred to as sleep techs)?

    The NC General Assembly enacted NCGS 90-677, the Polysomnography Practice Act, on October 1, 2009. The statute requires the NC Medical Board to establish a registry of sleep techs. The Polysomnography Practice Act makes it unlawful, beginning January 1, 2012, for any unregistered sleep tech to practice polysomnography, represent themselves as someone credentialed to practice polysomnography or use the title “Registered Polysomnographic Technologist.”

  • What if a sleep tech fails to register?

    Under the new law, it shall be a Class 1 misdemeanor to practice polysomnography without registering with the Medical Board. Failure to register could result in criminal prosecution or a court injunction barring the unregistered sleep tech from practicing.

  • Will the Medical Board process complaints and investigate possible violations of the Polysomnography Practice Act and/or disciplinary matters?

    No. The Medical Board is directed by statute only to maintain the registry. Complaints and investigations of violations of the Polysomnography Practice Act shall be directed to and conducted by the national Board of Registered Polysomnographic Technologists.

  • Are there any exemptions to the registration requirement?

    Yes. Persons who are registered, certified, credentialed or licensed to engage in a profession other than polysomnography or any person working under the supervision of a person who is registered, certified, credentialed or licensed to engage in another profession are not required to register with the Board if: 1. The person is performing work incidental to or within the scope of practice of that profession or occupation and 2. The person does not represent him- or herself as a registered polysomnographic technologist.

    In addition, the following individuals are not required to register: 1. individuals employed by the U.S. government; 2. persons performing research that monitors physiological parameters during sleep or wakefulness for purposes not related to the practice of clinical medicine; 3. licensed physicians, physician assistants and nurse practitioners; and 4. students actively enrolled in a polysomnography education program, provided the student is working under the direct supervision of a registered polysomnographic technologist and complies with all applicable rules.

  • When will the Medical Board be ready to accept registration information?

    The Board expects to have its online registration system ready to accept information by Sept. 15, 2011.

  • Will the Medical Board accept paper registration forms?

    No. The registration will be an online process, which sleep techs will access via the Medical Board’s website. It may be necessary for sleep techs to email, mail or fax certain information to the Medical Board to document their credentials.

  • Will sleep techs pay a registration fee?

    Yes. The registration fee, which is set by statute, will be $50.

  • How often must sleep techs register with the Medical Board?

    Once the registration system is in place, sleep techs must register annually, on or before Sept. 1.

  • What information must be submitted to the Medical Board?

    Registrants must provide: 1. Their full legal name; 2. Their complete address and current telephone number; 3. Evidence that they are currently credentialed in good standing by the Board of Registered Polysomnographic Technologists (BRPT.)

  • What constitutes "evidence" that the sleep tech is credentialed in good standing by the Board of Registered Polysomnographic Technologists?

    Registrants must attest that they are currently credentialed by the BRPT. The Medical Board will verify the sleep tech’s credentials with the BRPT. If the NCMB is unable to verify that a registrant is currently credentialed by the BRPT, the sleep tech may be required to provide a copy of his or her certificate.

  • Has the Medical Board issued supervision protocols for registered polysomnographic technologists?

    Yes. The Medical Board published the protocols in its quarterly newsletter, the Forum. They appear in the latter half of this article.

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Professional Corporations and Limited Liability Companies

  • Is it okay to renew my Professional Corporation registration online using a mobile device?

    No, it is not recommended. Mobile devices are not supported at this time.

  • What is a professional corporation, association or limited liability company?

    Professional Corporation/Association
    A professional corporation/association (PC/PA) is a corporation which provides a professional licensed service to the public. The PC/PA must be registered with the licensing board that regulates the professional service to be provided. Please visit the NC Secretary of State’s website for more information about professional corporations.

    Professional Limited Liability Company
    A professional limited liability company (PLLC) is a business organization permitted to be established under North Carolina law and is owned by members (rather than shareholders of a corporation) and managed by managers (rather than officers and directors of a corporation).  NC General Statute 57C-2-01(c) permits a professional limited liability company to render professional services to the same extent as a professional corporation established under NC General Statute 55B. Please visit the NC Secretary of State’s website for more information on professional limited liability companies.

  • Who can form a professional corporation, association or limited liability company?

    A licensed physician and/or physician assistant may form a professional corporation, association or limited liability company as a sole shareholder/member or can incorporate/organize with other physicians or physician assistants to provide medical services. NCGS 55B-14 (a) A professional corporation shall render only one specific type professional service, and such services as may be ancillary thereto, and shall not engage in any other business or profession; provided, however, such corporation may own real and personal property necessary or appropriate for rendering the type of professional services it was organized to render and it may invest in real estate, mortgages, stocks, bonds, and any other type of investments.

  • Can a physician or physician assistant incorporate or organize with others?

    Yes. There are several combinations of professional services allowed under NCGS 55B that require registration and certification from the respective professional licensing boards. [NCGS 55B-14 (c)]
    A professional corporation may also be formed by, between or among:

    • A licensed psychologist and a physician practicing psychiatry to render psychotherapeutic and related services.
    • A physician and a physician assistant who are licensed, registered or otherwise certified under Chapter 90 of the General Statutes to render medical and related services.
    • A physician, a licensed psychologist, a licensed clinical social worker or each of them and a certified clinical specialist in psychiatric and mental health nursing, a licensed marriage and family therapist, a licensed professional counselor, or each of them, to render psychotherapeutic and related services that the respective stockholders are licensed, certified, or otherwise approved to provide.
    • A physician and any combination of a nurse practitioner, certified clinical specialist in psychiatric and mental health nursing or certified nurse midwife, registered or otherwise certified under Chapter 90 of the General Statutes, to render medical and related services that the respective stockholders are licensed, certified, or otherwise approved to provide.
    • A physician practicing anesthesiology and a certified nurse anesthetist to render anesthesia and related medical services that the respective stockholders are licensed, certified or otherwise approved to provide.
    • A physician and an audiologist who is licensed under Article 22 of Chapter 90 of the General Statutes to render audiological and related medical services that the respective stockholders are licensed, certified or otherwise approved to provide.
    • A physician practicing ophthalmology and an optometrist who is licensed under Article 6 of Chapter 90 of the General Statutes to render either or both of ophthalmic services and optometric and related services that the respective stockholders are licensed, certified or otherwise approved to provide.
    • A physician practicing orthopedics and a podiatrist who is licensed under Article 12A of Chapter 90 of the General Statutes to render either or both of orthopedic services and podiatric and related services that the respective stockholders are licensed, certified or otherwise approved to provide.
  • If I plan to offer more than one type of professional service, should I obtain a certificate of registration for each allowable combination of professional services?

    Yes. If more than one type of professional service is rendered, a certificate of registration must be obtained from the respective professional licensing boards for each professional service provided by a professional corporation or limited liability company.

  • Can a physician assistant own a professional corporation or limited liability company?

    Yes. A licensed physician assistant may form their own practice to render the professional service he/she is licensed to provide.
    Please read the Forum article written by staff attorney Marcus Jiminson, JD, for more information.
    PA and NP Ownership of Professional Corporations”  (Fall, 2006: pgs. 17-18)

  • Can a PA form a professional corporation or limited liability company with a physician, yet the PA owns a majority of the stock or membership?

    Yes. Please read the Forum article written by staff attorney Marcus Jiminson, JD, for more information.
    PA and NP Ownership of Professional Corporations”  (Fall, 2006: pgs. 17-18)

  • Can a PA own 100 percent of a professional corporation or limited liability company and hire physicians as employees or independent contractors to practice medicine?

    No. Please read the Forum article written by staff attorney Marcus Jiminson, JD, for more information.
    PA and NP Ownership of Professional Corporations”  (Fall, 2006: pgs. 17-18)

  • Do I need to notify the NC Medical Board if I sell my practice or merge with another business?

    Yes. In compliance with NCGS 55B, you must obtain prior aprroval from the NC Medical Board if you change ownership of a professional corporation, association or limited liability company registered with the Board.

  • Are there any limitations on ownership/membership of capital stock in a professional corporation, association or limited liability company?

    Yes. Shares of capital stock or membership may only be held by a licensee, as defined in NC General Statute 55B-2(2).  A “licensee” means any natural person who is duly licensed by the appropriate licensing board to render the same professional services which will be rendered by the professional corporation of which he/she is, or intends to become, an officer, director, shareholder or employee.

  • Where can I find information on how to register a professional corporation, association or limited liability company and the requirements to maintain the registration?

    On the NCMB website, visit the section for ‘Licensing’ and choose the link to either corporations or limited liability companies.

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Reactivating or Reinstating a License

  • Who is eligible to submit an application to reactivate a physician license?

    Reactivation is appropriate for physicians who were previously licensed in NC and have been inactive for LESS THAN one year.
    However, if the license was made inactive as a result of a disciplinary action by the Board (e.g., suspension) the physician MAY NOT submit an application for reactivation, even if he or she was inactive for less than 12 months.

  • What is the difference between a license reactivation and a license reinstatement?

    In short, reactivation is for practitioners who were previously licensed in NC and have been inactive for LESS THAN one year. Reinstatement is for previously-licensed practitioners who have been inactive for MORE THAN one year and for ALL licensees who are inactive as a result of disciplinary action by the Board.

  • If a physician does not meet the criteria to reactivate a license, what other options exist?

    Physicians who previously held a NC license but who have been inactive for MORE THAN one year may submit an application for reinstatement of their license.

    In addition, ALL licensees who are inactive as a result of disciplinary action by the Board, regardless of how long they have been inactive, must submit an application for reinstatement to be considered for an active medical license.

  • What is the process for reinstating a physician license?

    Candidates for reinstatement must essentially submit a new application for licensure in NC. See the full requirements for reinstating a NC physician license.

    It is important to understand that any licensee who has been out of clinical practice for two or more years must meet an additional requirement to reestablish their competence to practice medicine safely to the satisfaction of the Board. This typically involves having a licensed physician colleague approved by the Board mentor the re-entering licensee for a set period (this period is determined by the licensee and the Board on a case-by-case basis). Click here to read the Board’s Position Statement on the subject of competence and re-entering the practice of medicine.

  • What is the process for reactivating a physician license?

    A candidate for reactivation must complete a process similar to the annual license renewal. They must answer a series of detailed questions designed to identify potential problems or “red flags”, pay a fee, submit completed fingerprint cards to the Board and document continuing medical education (CME) earned during the period they were inactive (if any), among other requirements. See the full requirements for reinstating a NC physician license.

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Verifications

  • What do I need to do if I am applying for international adoption?

    If you are seeking verification of NC licensed doctors for international adoptions, please contact our office via .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).  In your email message, please include all relevant doctors’ names. The cost is $25 per doctor and you will receive two copies of the verification for each doctor.

  • Should I call to ensure you received my online request?

    This has a tendency to slow down the overall process. We email verifications immediately once they have been completed and paid for. What you really want to know is if the receiving end has processed it. If they have not received (or internally processed) the verification within two weeks, contact us and we will verify that the verification was emailed.

  • I took the exam in North Carolina. Can you send my scores?

    If the exam you took in North Carolina was the FLEX, SPEX or USMLE Steps 1, 2, and 3, you will need to request these scores directly from the Federation of State Medical Boards, which is the repository for these exam scores. However, if you took the North Carolina Licensing Exam prior to 1976, then you can request these scores by sending a written request along with a check or money order in the amount of $35.00 payable to the North Carolina Medical Board. The North Carolina Licensing Exam is an older exam predating FLEX, SPEX and USMLE.

  • What if the other state (or agency) will not accept an online verification?

    All state agencies are aware of our verification process and have approved it.

  • What if I need a “letter of good standing”, not a verification letter?

    Different boards and credentialing agencies have different names or terminology for licensure verification, including “letter of good standing”. The terms verification and letter of good standing are equivalent for any medical or training license you hold in North Carolina, whether active or inactive. The NCMB has had no problems with other states or authorities refusing to accept its verifications.

  • What if I have a form that needs to be completed?

    We do not accept verification requests via forms. Please use our online verification process.

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