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Reading Room

The reading room includes articles and videos of potential interest to consumers and medical professionals. The opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect the views of the NC Medical Board, its members and staff.

Americans stepping up to share their health data with All of Us: Research program marks first anniversary

The Nation’s Health
July Edition
Ana Pavon could not figure out why her 5-year-old son was acting strangely. In 2011, he developed jerking motions, facial tics and sometimes shouted uncontrollably. After seeing many doctors over weeks, he was diagnosed with Tourette syndrome. Her son’s trial-and-error medical experience motivated Pavon to join the All of Us Research Program, one of the largest and most diverse research cohorts in the nation. The Leesville, California, resident, who is Hispanic, hopes the nationwide program might one day improve health care for Hispanics and other U.S. populations underrepresented in medical research, including people with Tourette syndrome.

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How do you make a mental health app people actually want to use?

STATNews
July 15, 2019
Making medicines isn’t about aesthetics. Your pill doesn’t need to be pretty to work. But with mental health apps, good design is half the battle. App makers have to be able to translate traditional therapy techniques into easy exercises that people can flip through on their phones.

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A family’s medical mystery sheds light on the surprising ways disease-causing genes can be inherited

STATNews
July 8, 2019
To her family, Tatiana Legkiy looked completely healthy when she was born. But a pediatrician who listened to her heart heard something off. So within a few days of being born, she saw a specialist who did an echocardiogram and who, alarmed by the results, called an ambulance to take her to the hospital in Modesto, Calif.

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Health tech companies often flop. But this researcher’s track record suggests there’s a strategy for success

STATNews
July 3, 2019
A series of glass cabinets lines the back wall of this Stanford building, the shelves crowded with health technologies dreamed up here. There’s a bottle of thick blue gel that helps drugs stick inside the colon, a heartbeat-tracking patch, an under-the-sheets sensor that buzzes to prevent night terrors, and a baby doll with a dozen redesigned versions of an umbilical catheter lying next to its blanket.

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